Gertrude Abbie Tripp

F, #8022, b. 6 October 1885, d. 20 November 1970
Last Edited=6 Apr 2020
Relationships
1st cousin 3 times removed of Steven Harn Redman
Great-granddaughter of Isaac Perkins
4th great-granddaughter of John Foster
     Gertrude Abbie Tripp was born on 6 October 1885 at Minnesota. She was the daughter of Merritt Tripp and Sarah V. Perkins. Gertrude Abbie Tripp died on 20 November 1970 at Milbank, Grant Co., South Dakota, at age 85.
     She lived in 1909 at Bradley, Clark Co., South Dakota.

Gregory Robert Tripp

M, #8037
Last Edited=6 Apr 2020
Relationships
3rd cousin 1 time removed of Steven Harn Redman
3rd great-grandson of Isaac Perkins
6th great-grandson of John Foster
     Gregory Robert Tripp is the son of Phillip Burson Tripp and Shirley Rose Henneman. Gregory Robert Tripp married Sharon K. Dent, daughter of Kenneth Arthur Dent and Anna Marie (?), circa 1977 at Minnesota.

Child of Gregory Robert Tripp and Sharon K. Dent

Jeanne Tripp

F, #8035
Last Edited=6 Apr 2020
Relationships
3rd cousin 1 time removed of Steven Harn Redman
3rd great-granddaughter of Isaac Perkins
6th great-granddaughter of John Foster
     Jeanne Tripp married male Dinnerstein. Jeanne Tripp is the daughter of Phillip Burson Tripp and Shirley Rose Henneman.

Marion Rolfe Tripp

F, #8026, b. 29 September 1896, d. 8 November 1915
Last Edited=5 Apr 2020
Relationships
2nd cousin 2 times removed of Steven Harn Redman
2nd great-granddaughter of Isaac Perkins
5th great-granddaughter of John Foster
     Marion Rolfe Tripp was born on 29 September 1896. She was the daughter of Timothy Burton Tripp and Frances Rolfe (?) Marion Rolfe Tripp died on 8 November 1915 at age 19. She was buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Red Wing, Goodhue Co., Minnesota, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 April 2020), memorial page for Marion Rolfe Tripp (29 Sep 1896–8 Nov 1905), Find a Grave Memorial no. 91813131, citing Oakwood Cemetery, Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota, USA ; Maintained by Mookie (contributor 47515129) .
     Following obituary for Marion Rolfe Tripp:

November 11, 1915 Pierce County Herald - Marion Rolfe Trippe, daughter of Timothy B. Tripp of Red Wing, met death in the Wisconsin channel of the Mississippi River on Monday morning at about 8 o'clock and apparently indications point to the death as a suicide.
She was discovered struggling in the water by Charles Johnson, Pierce County farmer who was driving over the bridge. He rushed along the bank and waded out into the water to the depth of his neck. He could not reach her and accordingly called for help. C. A. Adams and his hired man hurried to the scene and a boat was secured. This was pushed into the stream and the girl's body was lifted into it. She was brought to shore and there was no signs of life. Miss Tripp was 19 years old and it is believed that the cause for her rash act was despondency.1

Citations

  1. [S2499] Marion Rolfe Trippe, Pierce County Herald (Wisconsin), n/a, 11 nov 1915, n/a. Hereinafter cited as Pierce County Herald (Wisconsin).

Merritt Tripp

M, #4249, b. 27 February 1837, d. 26 September 1911
Last Edited=16 Sep 2021
     Merritt Tripp was born on 27 February 1837 at Tompkins Co., New York.1 He was the son of George Tripp and Hannah Smith. Merritt Tripp married Sarah V. Perkins, daughter of Timothy Foster Perkins and Thirza Cottle Ellsworth, on 20 December 1865.1 Merritt Tripp died on 26 September 1911 at Featherstone Twsp., Goodhue Co., Minnesota, at age 74.2 He was buried at Hope Cemetery, Red Wing, Goodhue Co., Minnesota, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 April 2020), memorial page for Merritt Tripp (27 Feb 1836–26 Sep 1911), Find a Grave Memorial no. 102542703, citing Hope Cemetery, Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) .
Plot: Sec W.2
     He lived in 1861 at Featherstone Twsp., Goodhue Co., Minnesota. In 1878 Merritt Tripp was a farmer in Section 15, at Goodhue Co., Minnesota.1

TRIPP. Merritt, farmer, sec. 15, P.O. Red Wing. Born in Tompkins County, NY, February 27, 1837. Was engaged in farming there until 1861, when he came to this county, landing in Red Wing, May 17. Rented farm of Samuel Giles, in sec. 2. Was married December 20, 1865 to Abbie S. Perkins. She was born in Franklin County, Maine, May 10, 1847. In 1866, he purchased this farm consisting of 160 acres. They have three children, Cora P. born September 10, 1867, Timothy B., April 6, 1870, and Anna May, March 27, 1874. Family attends the M.E. Church. History of Goodhue County, Red Wing, 1878.1 He lived in 1909 at 721 Fifth St., Red Wing, Goodhue Co., Minnesota.

BOOK - HISTORY OF GOODHUE COUNTY, MN. PUBLISHED IN 1909 Merritt Tripp, a
retired farmer, living at 721 Fifth street, Red Wing, comes of eastern
parentage, born in Tompkins county, New York, February 27, 1837. His
parents, George and Hannah (Smith) Tripp, were natives of eastern New York
state, where they both spent the span of their years, the former dying in
1841 and the mother in 1880. Left fatherless at an early age, Merritt Tripp
had to obtain what education he could by attending school during the short
winter terms, working on farms in the summer, thus contributing in boyhood
to his own support and later to the support of the family. While working in
the crowded state of his birth, he longed for wider opportunities that were
afforded in thickly populated districts, and accordingly decided to come
west. In 1861 he located in Featherstone township, this county, where he
purchased 160 acres. To this he added 160 more, and still later made other
purchases, until at one time he owned an entire section. Upon his broad and
rich acres he carried on general farming until the fall of 1901, when he
retired. For four years he rented his farm and at the end of that time sold
it, purchasing his present residence at 721 Fifth street. For twenty years
he was town treasurer of Featherstone, and in addition served a number of
terms as town supervisor and school director. He is a Democrat in politics,
and has been a member of the Masonic order thirty years. He has also been a
member of the Odd Fellows. Mr. Tripp was married November 22, 1864, to
Abbie S. Perkins, of Maine, daughter of Timothy and Thurza (Ellsworth)
Perkins, the former of whom died in June, 1889, and the latter October 30,
1882. Mrs. Tripp has one brother, T. E. Perkins, now living at
Featherstone. To Mr. and Mrs. Tripp have been born seven children-Cora P.,
September 10, 1866; Timothy. B., April 6, 1870; Anna M., March 26, 1870;
one born in February, 1875, who died in infancy; Frank Ml., born November
3, 188z; Gertrude A., October 6, 1885; Blanche II., April 5, 1887. Cora
married F. D. Crandall and lives at Aberdeen, S. ). Timothy is married and
lives at Red Wing. Anna married C. Crandall and lives at Randolph, Minn.
Frank is married and is an electrical engineer at Decatur, Ill. Gertrude A.
is principal of public schools at Bradley, S. D., and Blanche F. is
teaching in Afton, Washington county, this state. The family religion is
that of the Methodist Church.

Census

CensusDatePlace
CensusAugust 1870Featherstone, Goodhue Co., Minnesota, 33 years old
Census4 August 1870Featherstone, Goodhue Co., Minnesota, listed as 33 years old, born in New York
CensusJune 1880Featherstone, Goodhue Co., Minnesota

Children of Merritt Tripp and Sarah V. Perkins

Citations

  1. [S1671] Unknown editor, editor, History of Goodhue County, Red Wing (Red Wing, Minnesota: Wood, Alley & Co., 1878). Hereinafter cited as History of Goodhue County.
  2. [S1672] "Minnesota Burials by John Dalby", Minnesota Burials by John Dalby, online http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?gsfn=merritt&gsln=tripp&gsby=&gsbco=2%2cUnited+States&gsbpl=35%2cNew+York&gsdy=&gsdco=2%2cUnited+States&gsdpl=1%2cAll+States&gsoco=2%2cUnited+States&gsopl=1%2cAll+States&rank=1&ti=0&ti.si=0&gss=angs&submit.x=24&s. Previously published in hard copy (Provo, Utaj: MyFamily.com, 2003). Hereinafter cited as "Minnesota Burials."

Phillip Burson Tripp

M, #8033, b. 9 November 1915, d. 25 December 1992
Last Edited=13 May 2021
Relationships
2nd cousin 2 times removed of Steven Harn Redman
2nd great-grandson of Isaac Perkins
5th great-grandson of John Foster
Phillip Burson Tripp
     Phillip Burson Tripp was born on 9 November 1915 at Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota. He was the son of Frank Merritt Tripp and Lydia R. Smith. Phillip Burson Tripp married Shirley Rose Henneman on 2 January 1947. Phillip Burson Tripp died on 25 December 1992 at Hennepin Co., Minnesota, at age 77. He was buried at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 April 2020), memorial page for SSGT Philip Burson Tripp (9 Nov 1915–25 Dec 1992), Find a Grave Memorial no. 3511064, citing Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) .
     https://bataanproject.com/
This site is dedicated to the men of Company B, 192nd Tank Battalion, Illinois Army National Guard

Tripp, PFC Philip B.
194th - HQ Co., 194th Tank Battalion, Noto Maru, Provisional Tank Group

PFC Philip Burson Tripp was born in Minneapolis on November 9, 1915, and was one of two sons of Frank M. Tripp & Lydia R. Smith-Tripp. His family resided at 3857 Garfield Avenue in South Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The Selective Service Act went to effect on October 16, 1940, and Phil registered for the draft. He made his father his next of kin on the form and indicated that he was working for his father who appears to have been an electrician.

Philip was inducted into the army on April 14, 1941, and assigned to HQ Company, 194th Tank Battalion at Fort Lewis, Washington, as a radio operator. This was done to fill out the ranks of the company which had been created at Ft. Lewis. During his training, he was sent to radio school at Fort Knox, Kentucky, where he qualified as a radio operator, which indicates that he was assigned to one of three tanks assigned to HQ Company.

On August 15, 1941, orders were issued from Ft. Knox, Kentucky, to the 194th, for duty in the Philippines because of an event that happened during that summer. A squadron of American fighters was flying over Lingayen Gulf when one of the pilots, whose plane was at a lower altitude, noticed something odd in the water. He took his plane down and identified a buoy in the water. He came upon more buoys that lined up, in a straight line, in the direction of a Japanese occupied island. The squadron continued their flight plan to Mariveles before returning to When the squadron landed he reported what he had seen. The next morning, when another squadron flew to the area, the buoys had been picked up and a fishing boat was seen heading toward shore. Since communication was poor between the Air Corps and Navy, the boat was not intercepted. It was at that time the decision was made to build up the American military presence in the Philippines.

The battalion was ordered to San Francisco, California, and arrived at 7:30 A.M. on September 4 and ferried, on the U.S.A.T. General Frank M. Coxe to Ft. McDowell on Angel Island, where they received physicals and inoculations. Those who had health issues were held back and replaced by other soldiers. They boarded the S.S. President Calvin Coolidge and sailed to the Philippine Islands at 9:00 P.M. on September 8. The soldiers were quartered in the hold of the ship while the officers slept in wardrooms shared by four officers. At 7:00 A.M. on Saturday, September 13, the ship arrived at Honolulu, Hawaii, and the soldiers were allowed ashore but had to be on board the ship before the ship sailed at 5:00 P.M.

After leaving Hawaii, the ship was joined by, a heavy cruiser, the U.S.S. Astoria and an unknown destroyer. On several occasions, smoke was seen on the horizon and the cruiser revved its engines up and took off in the direction of the smoke. Each time, the ship belonged to a friendly country. The ships arrived in Manila Bay on Friday, September 26, in the morning, but the soldiers did not disembark until 3:00 P.M. The battalion, minus its maintenance section, rode buses to Ft. Stotsenburg. The maintenance section and 17th Ordnance remained behind on the pier to unload the tanks and reattach the turrets which had been removed so that the tanks would fit in the ship’s hold.

The soldiers were greeted by Colonel Edward King who apologized to them that they had to live in tents. He made sure they were settled into their bivouac before he left.

The soldiers spent the next weeks cleaning their weapons of cosmoline. The guns were sealed in it to prevent them from rusting on the trip to the Philippines. At one point, the battalion went on a maneuver to Lingayen Gulf.

The first week of December 1941, the 194th was ordered to its position at Clark Field. Their job was to protect the airfield from paratroopers. Two crewmen remained with the tanks at all times.

In September 1941, the 194th was sent to San Francisco for transport to the Philippine Islands. Arriving in the Philippines the battalion was housed in tents since their barracks were unfinished. They were moved into barracks in November.

On December 8, 1941, Philip lived through the Japanese attack on Clark Airfield. On December 19, he sent home this message by cablegram: “All ok. Everything fine. Best of health. Chin up.” He also told them to tell the parents of Phil Brain and Bill McKeon that they were fine. For the next four months, he saw action in various engagements against the Japanese.

On March 5, 1942, Philip picked up a Japanese leaflet that was supposed to convince them to surrender. He sent it home to his father. In the letter he mailed home he told how the leaflet made the Filipinos furious because they knew the truth about how they would be treated by the Japanese. “They knew that Japanese allegations of friendship and protection were false from previous experiences. The native troops and civilians would fight on, even though conquered.” He also told his family he was well and gone through several battles without a scratch.

On April 9, 1942, he became a Prisoner of War when Bataan was surrendered to the Japanese. In Mariveles at the southern tip of Bataan Philip began what became known as the death march. Philip believed that he would have never survived the march had he known how brutal the 65 miles were going to be. He watched as men were shot and beaten. He felt that the Japanese purposely starved the POWs.

At San Fernando, he and the other POWs were crammed into small wooden boxcars for transport to Capas. The POWs were packed in so tightly that those who died remained standing until the living climbed out of the cars. Philip and the other POWs made their way to Camp O’Donnell.

The camp was an unfinished Filipino training base that was pressed into use as a POW camp on April 1, 1942. When they arrived at the camp, the Japanese confiscated any extra clothing that the POWs had and refused to return it to them. They searched the POWs and if a man was found to have Japanese money on them, they were taken to the guardhouse. Over the next several days, gunshots were heard to the southeast of the camp. These POWs had been executed for looting.

There was only one water faucet in the camp, and the prisoners stood in line from two to eight hours waiting for a drink. The Japanese guards at the faucet would turn it off for no reason and the next man in line would stand as long as four hours waiting for it to be turned on again. This situation improved when a second faucet was added.

There was no water for washing clothes, so the POWs would throw out their clothing when it had been soiled. In addition, water for cooking had to be carried three miles from a river to the camp and mess kits could not be washed. The slit trenches in the camp were inadequate and were soon overflowing since most of the POWs had dysentery. The result was that flies were everywhere in the camp including the POW kitchens and in the food.

The camp hospital had no soap, water, or disinfectant. When the ranking American doctor at the camp wrote a letter to the camp commandant, Capt. Yohio Tsuneyoshi, asking for medical supplies, he was told never to write another letter. When the Archbishop of Manila sent a truckload of medical supplies to the camp, Tsuneyoshi refused to allow the truck into the camp. When the Philippine Red Cross sent medical supplies to the camp the Japanese took 95% of the supplies for their own use.

The POWs in the camp hospital lay on the floor elbow to elbow and only one of the six medics – assigned to care for 50 sick POWs in the camp hospital – was healthy enough to care for them. When a representative of the Philippine Red Cross stated they could supply a 150-bed hospital for the camp, he was slapped in the face by a Japanese lieutenant.

Each morning, the bodies of the dead were found all over the camp and were carried to the hospital and placed underneath it. The bodies lay there for two or three days before they were buried in the camp cemetery by other POWs who were suffering from dysentery and/or malaria. To clean the ground under the hospital, the ground was scraped and lime was spread over it. The bodies of the dead were placed in the cleaned area, and the area they had lain in was scraped and lime was spread over it.

Work details were sent out on a daily basis. Each day, the American doctors gave a list of names to the Japanese of the POWs who were healthier enough to work. If the quota of POWs needed to work could not be met, the Japanese put those POWs who were sick but could walk, to work. The death rate among the POWs reached 50 men dying a day. The Japanese finally acknowledge that they had to do something, so the opened a new POW camp at Cabanatuan.

On June 1, 1942, the POWs formed detachments of 100 men each and were marched to Capas. There, they were put in steel boxcars with two Japanese guards. At Calumpit, the train was switched onto another line which took it to Cabanatuan. The POWs disembarked and were taken to a schoolyard where they were fed cooked rice and onion soup. From there, they were marched to Cabanatuan which had been the headquarters of the 91st Philippine Army Division and was known as Camp Pangatian. The transfer of POWs was completed on June 4.

The camp was actually three camps. Camp 1 was where the men who captured on Bataan and taken part in the death march where held. Camp 2 did not have an adequate water supply and was closed. It later reopened and housed Naval POWs. Camp 3 was where those men captured when Corregidor surrendered were taken. In addition, men from Bataan who had been hospitalized when the surrender came were sent to the camp. Camp 3 was later consolidated into Camp 1.

Once in the camp, the POWs were allowed to run the camp. The Japanese only entered if they had an issue they wanted to deal with. To prevent escapes, the POWs set up a detail that patrolled the fence of the camp. The reason this was done was that those who did escape and were caught were tortured before being executed, while the other POWs were made to watch. It is believed that no POW successfully escaped from the camp.

In the camp, the Japanese instituted the “Blood Brother” rule. If one man escaped the other nine men in his group would be executed. POWs caught trying to escape were beaten. Those who did escape and were caught were tortured before being executed. It is not known if any POW successfully escaped from the camp.

The barracks in the camp were built to house 50 POWs, but most had between 60 to 120 POWs in them. The POWs slept on bamboo slats, without mattresses, bedding, or mosquito netting. Many quickly became ill. The POWs were assigned to barracks which meant that the members of their group lived together, went out on work details together, and would be executed together since they were Blood Brothers.

The POWs were sent out on work details one was to cut wood for the POW kitchens. The two major details were the farm detail and the airfield detail which lasted for years. A typical day on any detail lasted from 7:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. The POWs on the farm detail would have to go to a shed each morning to get tools. As they left the shed, the Japanese guards thought it was great fun to hit them over their heads.

The detail was under the command of “Big Speedo” who spoke very little English. When he wanted the POWs to work faster, he told the POWs “speedo.” Although he was known to have a temper, the POWs thought he was fair. Another guard was “Little Speedo” who was smaller and also used “speedo” when he wanted the POWs to work faster. The POWs also felt he was pretty fair in his treatment of them.

“Smiley” was another guard who always had a smile on his face but could not be trusted. He was the meanest of the guards and beat men up for no reason. He liked to hit the POWs with the club. Any prisoner who he believed was not working hard enough got knocked over with it. Any prisoner who he believed was not working hard enough got knocked over with it. Each morning, after arriving at the farm, the POWs went into a tool shed to get their tools. As they left the shed, the guards hit them on their heads.

Other POWs worked in rice paddies. While working in the fields, the favorite punishment given to the men in the rice paddies was to have their faces pushed into the mud and stepped on by a guard to drive their faces deeper into the mud. Returning from a detail the POWs bought or were given, medicine, food, and tobacco, which they somehow managed to get into the camp even though they were searched when they returned.

Rice was the main food given to the POWs fed to them as “lugow” which meant “wet rice.” During their time in the camp, they received few vegetables and almost no fruit. Once in awhile, they received bread.

The camp hospital consisted of 30 wards that could hold 40 men each, but it was more common for them to have 100 men in them. Each man had approximately an area of 2 feet by 6 feet to lie in. The sickest POWs were put in “Zero Ward,” which was called this because it was missed by the Japanese when they counted barracks. The Japanese put a fence up around the building to protect themselves and would not go into the area. There were two rolls of wooden platforms around the perimeter of the building. The sickest POWs were put on the lower platform which had holes cut into it so they could relieve themselves. Most of those who entered the ward died.

On Tuesday, February 2, 1943, Philip was admitted to the camp’s hospital. No reason was recorded as to why he was admitted, and no date indicating when he was discharged was recorded. It should be mentioned that in May 1943, his parents learned that he was a POW. It was the first information on him in thirteen months. They later received two POW postcards from him dated May 6, 1944, and July 22, 1944.

It is known that in August 1944, Philip was selected to be sent to Japan. On August 25, he was boarded onto the Noto Maru which sailed, for Japan, on August 27, 1944. The ship spent the night in Subic Bay before sailing the next day. The ship stopped at Takao, Formosa, on August 30 and sailed for and arriving at Keelung, Formosa, the same day. It sailed again on August 31 and arrived at Moji, Japan, on September 4, 1944.

In Japan, he was sent to Sendai #6, which was also known as Hanawa, where 500 POWs worked in the copper mine owned by Mitsubishi and under company supervision. The camp was approximately 200 feet wide by 350 feet long and had a 12-foot high wooden fence around it and was located at 4,000 feet. The POWs were housed in wooden barracks, with 30-foot ceilings, and two tiers of bunks, against each long wall, with straw matting and a mattress stuffed with straw for sleeping. They also had a 4? by 4? by 8? block of wood for a pillow.

The floors of the barracks were packed dirt with a center aisle. There were covered walkways, without sides, that connected the barracks. To heat the barracks, there was a small potbelly stove. If they were lucky, the Japanese gave them enough wood for an hour’s heat. The POWs – who worked in the foundry – stole coal knowing that if they were caught they would be beaten. The barracks were not insulated and the heavy snow – which was as deep as 10 feet – served as insulation.

Other buildings in the camp were two buildings that served as a hospital for the POWs and an “L” shaped building that was the kitchen and POW bath. The latrines were three low buildings, and there was one building that served as the camp office. The POWs spent several days setting up the camp.

In the camp, 500 POWs worked in the copper mine owned by Mitsubishi Mining Company and worked under company supervision. The POWs woke up at 5 A.M. and ate breakfast which was a small bowl of rice, barley or millet, and watery soup. Meals for the POWs were brought to the barracks, in buckets, and the POWs ate at tables in the barracks. After breakfast, at 5:30, roll call was taken and the POWs and the POWs left the camp. They arrived at the mine at 7 A.M., had a half-hour lunch, and worked until 5:00 P.M. before returning to camp, usually after dark, and had supper. Afterward, they went to bed.

The clothing issued to the POWs was a combination of Japanese clothing, made of thin cloth and shoes, and captured American clothing. For the winter the POWs were issued a uniform made of burlap and long socks. Those who needed shoes were issued Japanese canvas shoes with webbing between two toes. They also received grass shoe covers so they could get through the snow.

Work details were set up for POWs who were machinists, electricians, mechanics. Those who did not have these skills were assigned to working at a foundry or mining. The POWs worked in a copper mine owned by Mitsubishi. Each day, the POWs were marched up the side of a mountain to the top and then down into the mine. To their amazement, their guards always seemed to be waiting for them. It turned out there was a tunnel into the mine which the guards used so they did not have to climb the mountain.

Each detail had a “honcho” who was employed by Mitsubishi and supervised the POWs. They carried a large stick which they used on the POWs when they felt they were not working hard enough. The POWs believed these supervisors wanted to work them to death. At the mine, the POWs were divided among drillers, car loaders, and car pushers, with the miners having the worst job.

The work in the mine was dirty, dangerous, and difficult. Each miner received a carbide headlamp as his only lighting. A quota was set but the Japanese and the Japanese were always raising the quota. The number of carloads mined by the men was never enough. The POWs were beaten for not working hard enough or fast enough. Many shafts of the mine were so low that the miners had to crawl through to get to the ore. Some shafts had standing water with threats of sudden flooding. Most areas were not even shored up to prevent cave-ins. Accidents were frequent and many POWs were hurt. There was no gas detecting equipment and there was always the danger of setting off an explosion from the open burning carbide headlamps.

Mitsubishi expected the Japanese Army to supply a certain number of POWs to work in the mine each day so men too sick to work were sent to work. To meet the quota, the sick had to be carried between two healthier POWs to the mine. Since the Japanese found that the sick were too ill to work, the company came up with work for them to do in the camp like making nails or rope. If a POW still could not work, his rations were cut in half.

In the camp, the Japanese withheld the Red Cross packages from the POWs and took the canned meats, canned fruit, canned milk, and cheese for themselves. Blankets and clothing intended for the POWs were used by the guards. If a POW violated a rule, the grain ration, for all the POWs, was reduced by 20 percent. At one point, 49 POWs were lined up – because one POW had broken a rule – and beaten with leather belts.

While working in the mine from November 1944 until August 15, 1945, the POWs were abused by the civilian foreman, Hichiro Tsuchiya, who was known to the POWs as “Patches.” Tsuchiya used any excuse to abuse the POWs. He was known to hit the POWs for no reason in their faces and to also use a wooden club or pickaxe handle. He also used a sledgehammer to hit the POWs on their heads. His parents received a postcard from him in January 1945.

On August 16, the POWs noticed all the guards were gone and only the camp commander who told them to paint the letters “POW” on the roofs of all the buildings so any planes flying over would know they were there. They were told the war was over on August 20 by the camp commandant in his broken English.

“Peace, peace comes to the world again. It is a great pleasure to me, to say nothing to you, to announce it for all of you now. The Japanese Empire acknowledges the terms of the suspension of hostilities given by the American Government even these two Nations do not still reach the best agreement of a truce. As a true friend from now, I am going to do my best in the future for the convenience of your life in this camp because of having been able to get friendly relations between them, and also the Japanese Government has decided her own Nations policy for your Nation.

“Therefore I hope you will keep as comfortable a daily life by the orders of your own officers from today, while you are here. All of you will surely get much gladness in returning to your lovely country. At the same one of my wishes for you is this: Your health and happiness calls upon you and your life henceforth and they will grow up happier and better than before by the honor of your country.

“In order to guard your life I have been endeavoring my ability, therefore you will please cooperate with me in any way more than usual, I hope.

“I close this statement in letting you know again how peace, the peace has already come.”

It should be noted that nowhere in his speech did the camp commander say that Japan had surrendered.

An American Naval plane flew over the camp on August 27. The pilot dropped a note to the POWs and told them to paint one stripe on the roof of a barrack if they needed medicine, two stripes if they needed food, and three stripes if they needed clothing. The POWs painted one stripe on one barrack, two stripes on another barrack, and three stripes on a third barrack.

When the plane returned. he dropped another note saying that there was no way for him to drop everything, so B -29s would have to drop the supplies. The POWs had no idea what the pilot was talking about. When the B-29s appeared over the camp, the POWs had never seen anything so large in the sky. The POWs received so much food and clothing that they shared it with the Japanese civilians who had been kind to them

On August 28, 29, and September 1, food was dropped near the camp by American planes. The Japanese civilians helped the POWs carry it into the camps. A great number of the former POWs gorged themselves on the food and became sick, but no one became seriously ill. The only thing the civilians were interested in was the silk from the parachutes so that they could make clothing.

A jeep with American Military Police arrived on September 2, 1945. The MPs patrolled the camp and kept the former POWs from leaving until arrangements were made to move the men. On September 13, the prisoners were sent to Yokohama by train, where they boarded the American hospital ship the U.S.S. Rescue on the 14th and received medical examinations. It was at that time the decision was made to send him to Okinawa on the U.S.S. San Juan. From there, he was taken by another ship to Japan. The reason for this was that the former POWs were in such poor physical shape that the American Military Command did not want them to be seen back home in this condition. In Philip’s case, he had gone from 165 pounds down to 87 pounds.

After being “fattened up” Philip was allowed to return home. It appears that he was flown home since no records have been found of He was discharged on April 17, 1946. Philip married, Shirley Henneman, on January 2, 1947. Two of his groomsmen were Sgt. William McKeon and Sgt. Philip Brian who were members of the 194th Tank Battalion. The couple became the parents of a son and daughter. He worked as an electrical contractor and was known for his love of food and his sense of humor.

Philip B. Tripp passed away on March 25, 1992, in Minneapolis and was buried at Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Minneapolis in Section 15, Site 2479.

Created on April 18, 2019.1

Children of Phillip Burson Tripp and Shirley Rose Henneman

Citations

  1. [S2500] Bataan Project, online https://bataanproject.com/provisional-tank-group/tripp-pfc-philip-b/. Hereinafter cited as Bataan Project.

Robert Smith Tripp

M, #8031, b. 27 October 1912, d. 8 February 1993
Last Edited=5 Apr 2020
Relationships
2nd cousin 2 times removed of Steven Harn Redman
2nd great-grandson of Isaac Perkins
5th great-grandson of John Foster
     Robert Smith Tripp was born on 27 October 1912 at Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota. He was the son of Frank Merritt Tripp and Lydia R. Smith. Robert Smith Tripp married Margaret Evelyn (?) Robert Smith Tripp died on 8 February 1993 at Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota, at age 80. He was buried at Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 April 2020), memorial page for SSGT Robert Smith Tripp (27 Oct 1912–8 Feb 1993), Find a Grave Memorial no. 3511065, citing Fort Snelling National Cemetery, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8) .
     He lived in December 1992 at Minneapolis, Hennepin Co., Minnesota.

Ryan Philip Tripp

M, #8041
Last Edited=6 Apr 2020
Relationships
4th cousin of Steven Harn Redman
4th great-grandson of Isaac Perkins
7th great-grandson of John Foster
     Ryan Philip Tripp is the son of Gregory Robert Tripp and Sharon K. Dent.

Timothy Burton Tripp1

M, #4777, b. 6 April 1870, d. 18 October 1949
Last Edited=6 Apr 2020
Relationships
1st cousin 3 times removed of Steven Harn Redman
Great-grandson of Isaac Perkins
4th great-grandson of John Foster
     Timothy Burton Tripp was born on 6 April 1870 at Goodhue Co., Minnesota.1 He was the son of Merritt Tripp and Sarah V. Perkins.1 Timothy Burton Tripp married Frances Rolfe (?) in 1896. Timothy Burton Tripp married Isabelle Watson in 1902. Timothy Burton Tripp died on 18 October 1949 at Olmsted Co., Minnesota, at age 79. He was buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Red Wing, Goodhue Co., Minnesota, Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 April 2020), memorial page for Timothy B Tripp (6 Apr 1870–1949), Find a Grave Memorial no. 91813127, citing Oakwood Cemetery, Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minnesota, USA ; Maintained by Mookie (contributor 47515129) .
     He lived in 1909 at Red Wing, Goodhue Co., Minnesota.

Census

CensusDatePlace
Census4 August 1870Featherstone, Goodhue Co., Minnesota, as 2/12 years old, born in Minnesota
CensusJune 1880Featherstone, Goodhue Co., Minnesota

Child of Timothy Burton Tripp and Frances Rolfe (?)

Child of Timothy Burton Tripp and Isabelle Watson

Citations

  1. [S1671] Unknown editor, editor, History of Goodhue County, Red Wing (Red Wing, Minnesota: Wood, Alley & Co., 1878). Hereinafter cited as History of Goodhue County.

unknown Tripp

?, #8020, b. February 1875
Last Edited=5 Apr 2020
Relationships
1st cousin 3 times removed of Steven Harn Redman
Great-grandchild of Isaac Perkins
4th great-grandchild of John Foster
     Unknown Tripp was born in February 1875. Unknown Tripp was the child of Merritt Tripp and Sarah V. Perkins.
     The cause of death was died in infancy.

Elizabeth Trnka

F, #4225, b. 10 October 1874, d. 13 September 1959
Last Edited=21 Jan 2013
     Elizabeth Trnka was born on 10 October 1874 at Veseli, Rice Co., Minnesota.1 She was the daughter of Joseph Trnka and female (?) Elizabeth Trnka married Joseph F. Skluzacek Sr., son of Joseph Skluzacek Sr. and Katherine Sticha, on 17 November 1891 at Veseli, Rice Co., Minnesota. Elizabeth Trnka died on 13 September 1959 at Lonsdale, Rice Co., Minnesota, at age 84.1 She was buried on 16 September 1959 at Calvary Cemetery, Lonsdale, Rice Co., Minnesota.1
     Her married name was Skluzacek. Rice County Families, Their History Our Heritage, 1981, pg 681. OBITUARY: Faribault Daily News, 01Oct1959.
Obituary - Faribault Daily News - 1 Oct 1959. "MRS. ELIZABETH SKLUZACEK LONSDALE (Special) - Funeral services were held for Mrs. Elizabeth Skluzacek at Lonsdale Wednesday morning, September 16, at the Church of the Immaculate Conception. The Rev. Richard Skluzacek officiated at the requiem high mass. Members of the Rosary and St. Ludmilla Societies, of which the deceased was a member, attended the services in a body. Also present were the most Rev. George Biskup, auxiliary Bishop of ... Iowa ... Rev. Mrsg. C.M. Popelka... of the New Prague Deanery; the Very Rev. Alexius Machacek, prior, St. Procopius Abey and the Rev. Father John Charlebois, chancellor. Also present were Louis Durary, Gary, Indiana; Stephen Kucera, Fort Atkinson, Iowa; Louis Urbanek, Little Turkey, Iowa, Stanley Hayek, Protivin, Iowa; Robert Dobihal, Veseli; Stanley Srnec, Minneapolis; Richard Skluzacek, St. Paul and relatives and friends from numerous cities and communities in Minnesota. Interment was in Calvary Cemetery in Lonsdale. Pallbearers were David, Gilbert, Ted. Jr., Adrian, Bernard and James Skluzacek, all grandsons of the deceased. Elizabeth Trnka was born on October 10, 1874, at Veseli to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Trnka. She married Joseph F. Skluzacek on November 17, 1891, at Veseli. The couple engaged in farming near New Prague. In 1923, they moved to a farm near Lonsdale and in 1935, retired from farming and moved into Lonsdale. The couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 1941 and their diamond anniversary in 1951. Mrs. Skluzacek died Sunday, September 13, at her home in Lonsdale. She is survived by eleven children Mrs. Frank A. (Ludmilla) Jirik, George A., John T., Ted R., Frank T., and Miss Josephine Skluzacek, all of Lonsdale, Joseph J., Edward E. Skluzacek of New Prague, sister M. Valeria, S.S.N.D, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the Rev. J.S. Skluzacek, Protivin, Iowa, the Rev. Valentine Skluzacek, O.S.B., St. Procopius Abbey, Lisle, Illinois; 45 granchildren and 72 great grandchildren. Mrs. Skluzacek was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, who died April 26, 1957; five sisters, Mrs. Mary Salaba, Mrs. Rose Kalina, Mrs. Anna Sevcik, Mrs. Barbara Sticha, and Mrs. Catherine Nohava and four brothers, Albert, Frank, John and Joseph Trnka."

Citations

  1. [S1495] John Dalby, Calvary Cem , Lonsdale, MN extract by John Dalby (n.p.: n.pub.).

Joseph Trnka

M, #6676
Last Edited=12 Dec 2011
     Joseph Trnka married female (?)

Child of Joseph Trnka and female (?)

Frank James Trombley

M, #3081
Last Edited=26 Mar 1998
Relationships
3rd cousin of Steven Harn Redman
3rd great-grandson of Jeremiah McCarthy
     Frank James Trombley married Sherry Shafer.1 Frank James Trombley is the son of Frank L. Trombley and Sylvia Lee Barry.

Citations

  1. [S1501] Letter from Yvonne Marie (Barry) Payne (P.O. Box 1502, Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459) to Steven Harn Redman, Mar 1998; Steven Harn Redman (2633 N. 1600 E., Layton, Davis Co., UT).

Frank L. Trombley

M, #3012, b. 4 October 1931, d. 20 April 2018
Last Edited=29 Jan 2021
     Frank L. Trombley was born on 4 October 1931 at Cook Co., Illinois.1 He married Sylvia Lee Barry, daughter of Basil Francis Barry and Esther Charlotte McCarthy, on 25 September 1954 at Chicago, Cook Co., Illinois.2 Frank L. Trombley died on 20 April 2018 at Illinois at age 86.
     SOURCE: Claire Kassinger letter 9/1994. SOURCE: Frank Trombley letter 01 Oct 1996. He lived in February 1997 at RR 1, Box 392A, Tinley Park, Cook Co., Illinois.

Citations

  1. [S1501] Letter from Yvonne Marie (Barry) Payne (P.O. Box 1502, Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459) to Steven Harn Redman, Mar 1998; Steven Harn Redman (2633 N. 1600 E., Layton, Davis Co., UT).
  2. [S712] Letter from Frank L. Trombley (RR 1, Box 392A, Tinley Park, IL 60477) to Steven Harn Redman, 01 Oct 1996; Steven Harn Redman (2633 N. 1600 E., Layton, Davis Co., UT).

Michael John Trombley

M, #3082
Last Edited=23 Aug 1997
Relationships
3rd cousin of Steven Harn Redman
3rd great-grandson of Jeremiah McCarthy
     Michael John Trombley is the son of Frank L. Trombley and Sylvia Lee Barry.

Valerie Jean Trombley

F, #3083
Last Edited=26 Mar 1998
Relationships
3rd cousin of Steven Harn Redman
3rd great-granddaughter of Jeremiah McCarthy
     Valerie Jean Trombley married William Shubert.1 Valerie Jean Trombley is the daughter of Frank L. Trombley and Sylvia Lee Barry.

Citations

  1. [S1501] Letter from Yvonne Marie (Barry) Payne (P.O. Box 1502, Santa Rosa Beach, FL 32459) to Steven Harn Redman, Mar 1998; Steven Harn Redman (2633 N. 1600 E., Layton, Davis Co., UT).

Henry Trowbridge

M, #107, b. 28 September 1798, d. 25 May 1859
Last Edited=3 Mar 2020
     Henry Trowbridge was born on 28 September 1798 at Bedford, Westchester Co., New York.1 He married Charlotte Purdy, daughter of Ebenezer Purdy and Eunice Purdy, on 28 February 1829 at New York. Henry Trowbridge died on 25 May 1859 at New York, New York Co., New York, at age 60.1 He was buried at Saint George Church Cemetery, Astoria, Queens Co., New York, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 March 2020), memorial page for Henry Trowbridge (28 Sep 1797–25 May 1859), Find A Grave Memorial no. 13510953, citing Saint George Church Cemetery, Astoria, Queens County, New York, USA ; Maintained by sorabji (contributor 46823572) .

Child of Henry Trowbridge and Charlotte Purdy

Citations

  1. [S107] Paul Bradley Purdy, A branch of the Purdy family descending from David and Eliza Ann Purdy with David's line from Francis Purdy of Fairfield 1595-1658. FHL Call Number 929.273 P972, pg 4 (Flint, Michigan: Purdy self-published, c1962). Hereinafter cited as The David Purdy Family.

Sarah Trowbridge

F, #7935, b. 15 March 1831, d. 18 March 1912
Last Edited=3 May 2020
Relationships
1st cousin 5 times removed of Steven Harn Redman
4th great-granddaughter of Francis (1) Purdy
     Sarah Trowbridge was born on 15 March 1831 at New York. She was the daughter of Henry Trowbridge and Charlotte Purdy. Sarah Trowbridge married Samuel B. Bartow circa 1850. Sarah Trowbridge died on 18 March 1912 at Fitchburg, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, at age 81. She was buried at Laurel Hill Cemetery, Fitchburg, Worcester Co., Massachusetts, Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 03 March 2020), memorial page for Sarah Trowbridge Bartow (15 Mar 1831–18 Mar 1912), Find A Grave Memorial no. 103124296, citing Laurel Hill Cemetery, Fitchburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts, USA ; Maintained by Bill Bourbeau (contributor 47387362) .
     As of circa 1850,her married name was Bartow.

Children of Sarah Trowbridge and Samuel B. Bartow

Eddie P. Trujillo Jr.

M, #4537
Last Edited=21 Jan 2013
     Eddie P. Trujillo Jr. and Marci Porter Camenisch were engaged.

Freda Trujillo

F, #4575, b. 2 April 1909, d. 12 January 1991
Last Edited=16 Sep 2021
Relationship
Grandmother of Terresa Ann Struck
     Freda Trujillo was born on 27 March 1909 birthdate from Social Security Death Index. She was born on 2 April 1909 at San Luis, Costilla Co., Colorado, info from Social Security Account Number form SS-5. She was the daughter of Luis Maria Trujillo and Eduardita Allen. Freda Trujillo married William Ismael Struck, son of George Struck and Juanita Teresa Tafoya, on 28 August 1926 at Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming.1 Freda Trujillo died on 12 January 1991 at Wyoming Medical Center, Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming, at age 81.2 She was buried on 16 January 1991 at Rock Springs Cemetery, Rock Springs, Sweetwater Co., Wyoming.2
     Her married name was Struck. She lived in 1937 at 729 N Kimball, Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming; Polk's Casper City Directory for 1937 lists William and Freda Struck. She lived in 1939 at 937 N Center, Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming; Polk's Casper City Directory for 1939 lists William and Freda Struck. She lived in 1941 at 708 N Kimball, Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming; Polk's Casper City Directory for 1941 lists William and Freda Struck. She lived bt__ ___ 1949-1990 at 836 Saint John St, Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming; Listed in Casper City Directories. Her Social Security Number was 520-16-2935, issued in Wyoming before 1951, lists birth as 27 Mar 1909, death as 12 Jan 1991, residence of Casper. The Social Security Administration Application for Social Security Account Number SS-5, lists Freda Trujillo Struck on 20Mar1940, living at 708 North Kimball, Casper, Wyoming. Being employed at Mary's Cafe in Casper. Born on 02Apr1909 at San Luis, Colorado to Louis Trujillo and Edna Allen.3


Rock Springs Daily Rocket Miner, Jan 19, 1991 (Rock Springs, WY)

FREDA T. STRUCK
CASPER—Rosary for Freda T. Struck, 81, was recited Monday, Jan. 14 at Memorial Chapel by Rev. Gary Ruzicka. Mass of the Resurrection was celebrated Tuesday, Jan. 15 at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church by Rev. Charlie Velasquez.
Burial was in St. Joseph’s Cemetery in Rock Springs. Graveside services were Wednesday, Jan. 16 with Rev. Fred Wendel of SS. Cyril and Methodius Catholic Church officiating.
Mrs. Struck died Jan. 12, 1991 at Wyoming Medical Center in Casper after a short illness. She was born March 25, 1909 in San Luis, Colo., to Luis and Edna (Allen) Trujillo.
On Aug. 28, 1926, she married William I. Struck in Casper. Mrs. Struck worked at Natrona County Memorial Hospital as a nurse aide until her retirement in the early 1960s.
She was an ember of St. Patrick’s Catholic Church. She was a former resident of Rock Springs and Superior.
Survivors include one son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. George Struck of Rock Springs; two daughters, Viola Bullignton and Betty Howell, both of Casper; one brother, George Trujillo of Santa Fe, N.M; one sister, Mary Ann McCarty of Fountain, Colo; 13 grandchildren including three from Rock Springs, William and Peggy Johnson and family, Bob and Bonnie Legerski and family and Steve and Susan Nichols and family and 31 great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; one daughter, Jane Eva; one grandson, John Johnson; six brothers; and two sisters.1

Census

CensusDatePlace
Census13 April 1940Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming4

Children of Freda Trujillo and William Ismael Struck

Citations

  1. [S2587] FREDA T. STRUCK, Rock Springs Miner (Rock Springs, WY), www.findagrave.com, 19 jan 1991. Hereinafter cited as Rock Springs Miner (Rock Springs, WY).
  2. [S2545] Findagrave.com website, database and images (1300 West Traverse Parkway, Lehi, Utah Co., Utah ), Freda (Trujillo) Struck, Memorial ID 76474707,
    Birth: 25 March 1909, San Luis, Costilla County, Colorado, USA
    Death: 12 January 1991, Casper, Natrona County, Wyoming, USA
    Burial: Rock Springs Cemetery, Rock Springs, Sweetwater County, Wyoming
    Source: Find a Grave
    SourceCitation: Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com: accessed 20 April 2021), memorial page for Freda Trujillo Struck (25 Mar 1909–12 Jan 1991), Find a Grave Memorial no. 76474707, citing Rock Springs Cemetery, Rock Springs, Sweetwater County, Wyoming, USA; Maintained by Angela Cable (contributor 47277708).

    Spouse William Ismael Struck 1904–1946
    Children Viola Virginia Struck Bullington 1929–2018 Betty W Struck Howell 1930–2015 George Struck 1931–2014,.
  3. [S1765] Social Security Death Index, online www.ancestry.com, Social Security Death Index Social Security Death Index
    Name: Freda T. Struck
    SSN: 520-16-2935
    Last Residence: 82602 Casper, Natrona, Wyoming, United States of America
    Born: 27 Mar 1909
    Died: 12 Jan 1991
    State (Year) SSN issued: Wyoming (Before 1951 ). Hereinafter cited as Social Security Death Index.
  4. [S2242] Struck, census, 1300 West Traverse Parkway, Lehi, Utah Co., Utah, Ancestry.com website, 1940 United States Federal Census

    Name: Freda Struck
    Respondent: Yes
    Age: 31
    Estimated birth year: abt 1909
    Gender: Female
    Race: White
    Birthplace: Colorado
    Marital Status: Married
    Relation to Head of House: Wife
    Home in 1940: Casper, Natrona, Wyoming
    Street: North Kimball
    House Number: 702 Rear
    Inferred Residence in 1935: Casper, Natrona, Wyoming
    Residence in 1935: Same Place
    Resident on farm in 1935: No
    Sheet Number: 14B
    Attended School or College: No
    Highest Grade Completed: Elementary school, 5th grade
    Household Members:
    Name Age
    William Struck 35
    Freda Struck 31
    Viola Struck 11
    Betty Struck 10
    George Struck 8

    Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Casper, Natrona, Wyoming; Roll: T627_4573; Page: 14B; Enumeration District: 13-9.
    Source Information:
    Ancestry.com. 1940 United States Federal Census (database on-line). Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
    Original data: United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1940. T627, 4,643 rolls.

George Trujillo

M, #8762
Last Edited=20 Apr 2021
Relationship
Granduncle of Terresa Ann Struck
     George Trujillo was the son of Luis Maria Trujillo and Eduardita Allen.
     George Trujillo lived in January 1991 at Santa Fe, Santa Fe Co., New Mexico.1

Citations

  1. [S2587] FREDA T. STRUCK, Rock Springs Miner (Rock Springs, WY), www.findagrave.com, 19 jan 1991. Hereinafter cited as Rock Springs Miner (Rock Springs, WY).

Jose Tranquilino Trujillo

M, #7894, b. 16 November 1846
Last Edited=25 Jan 2020
Relationship
2nd great-grandfather of Terresa Ann Struck
     Jose Tranquilino Trujillo was born on 16 November 1846 at Chamita, Rio Arriba Co., New Mexico. He married Maria Manuela Vigil.

Child of Jose Tranquilino Trujillo and Maria Manuela Vigil

Luis Maria Trujillo

M, #6372, b. 7 March 1880, d. 6 June 1951
Last Edited=20 Apr 2021
Relationship
Great-grandfather of Terresa Ann Struck
     Luis Maria Trujillo was born on 7 March 1880 at Costilla, Taos Co., New Mexico. He was the son of Jose Tranquilino Trujillo and Maria Manuela Vigil. Luis Maria Trujillo was baptized on 24 March 1880 at Sacred Heart, Costilla, Taos Co., New Mexico. He married Eduardita Allen, daughter of Robert A. Allen and Cleofis Romero, on 10 August 1903 at San Luis, Costilla Co., Colorado. Luis Maria Trujillo died on 6 June 1951 at age 71. He was buried at Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming.

Census

CensusDatePlace
Census8 April 1930Casper, Natrona Co., Wyoming, 1930 Federal Census in Casper, Natrona Co. lists following:

Louis Trujillo 50 years old born in Colorado.
Edna E. Trujillo 44 years old born in Colorado, wife.
John Trujillo 13 years old born in Colorado, son.
Marian Trujillo 9 years old born in Colorado, daughter.
Robert Trujillo 7 years old born in New Mexico, son.
George Trujillo 3 years 9/12 old born in Wyoming, son.
Louis Trujilo 23years old born in Colorado, son.
Becky Trujillo 23 years old born in New Mexico, daughter-in-law.
Frederick Trujillo 1 7/12 old born in Wyoming, grandson.
Gertrude Trujillo 4/12 mo old born in Wyoming, granddaughter.

Children of Luis Maria Trujillo and Eduardita Allen

Mary Ann Trujillo

F, #8763
Last Edited=20 Apr 2021
Relationship
Grandaunt of Terresa Ann Struck
     Mary Ann Trujillo was the daughter of Luis Maria Trujillo and Eduardita Allen. Mary Ann Trujillo married male McCarty.
     Her married name was McCarty. Mary Ann Trujillo lived in January 1991 at Fountain, El Paso Co., Colorado.

Helen Benfield Trumbull

F, #7399, b. 9 April 1912, d. 20 December 1988
Last Edited=15 Feb 2016
     Helen Benfield Trumbull was born on 9 April 1912 at Washington. She was the daughter of Willis Heral Trumbull and Edna Ruth Brien. Helen Benfield Trumbull married Frances Norris Boice, son of Norris Keith Boice and Celestine B. Tracey, on 26 December 1939 at Lake Co., Montana. Helen Benfield Trumbull died on 20 December 1988 at Yellowstone Co., Montana, at age 76.
     As of 26 December 1939,her married name was Boice.

Willis Heral Trumbull

M, #7573
Last Edited=18 Dec 2018
     Willis Heral Trumbull married Edna Ruth Brien.

Child of Willis Heral Trumbull and Edna Ruth Brien

Anna Rozelle Tryggestad

F, #7577
Last Edited=16 Sep 2020
     Anna Rozelle Tryggestad married Warren Leonard Hallen, son of Oscar Leonard Hallen and Anna C. Sklenar, on 4 December 1943 at Pierce Co., Washington.

Paul Tschantz

M, #3733
Last Edited=21 Oct 2018
     Paul Tschantz married Helen Jones, daughter of Fred Saxton Jones and Hazel Gertrude Harn.
     SOURCE: Mildred Harn letter March 1995, from Jeffrey J. Lipscomb.

Clifford D. Tschoerner Jr.1

M, #6799
Last Edited=19 Aug 2020
     Clifford D. Tschoerner Jr. married Rebecca Lynn Nestaval, daughter of Gregory Edward Nestaval and Lynn Ellen Hanson, on 4 June 2005 at Williamson Co., Texas.2

Citations

  1. [S2055] Marriage of Clifford Tschoerner and Rebecca Nestaval, online http://www.texasmarriagerecords.org/marriage-of-clifford-tschoerner-and-rebecca-nestaval.html. Hereinafter cited as Marriage of Clifford Tschoerner and Rebecca Nestaval.
  2. [S2055] Marriage of Clifford Tschoerner and Rebecca Nestaval, online http://www.texasmarriagerecords.org/marriage-of-clifford-tschoerner-and-rebecca-nestaval.html, Certificate Number 061969.

Blanche Elizabeth Tucker

F, #8181, b. 16 April 1895, d. 29 March 1958
Last Edited=6 May 2020
     Blanche Elizabeth Tucker was born on 16 April 1895 at Elk Point, Union Co., South Dakota. She married Frank A. Wayne on 19 February 1917 at Charles City, Floyd Co., Iowa. Blanche Elizabeth Tucker died on 29 March 1958 at Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California, at age 62.
     As of 19 February 1917,her married name was Wayne.

Child of Blanche Elizabeth Tucker and Frank A. Wayne